Wednesday, June 16, 2021

Ned Beatty, RIP -- June 16, 2021

 

listal.com

Actor Ned Beatty has died. He was good in everything I saw or heard him in.

listal.com


Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Tom Mix -- The Amazing Tale of Three Strange Comrades -- June 15, 2021

 

East Oregonian, 07-June-1921

100 years ago this month, Tom Mix was appearing in The Untamed, "The Amazing Tale of Three Strange Comrades -- a Man, a Horse and a Dog."

Albuquerque Evening Herald, 14-June-1921


Tom drives a stagecoach in A Ridin' Romeo. "The Romance of a Cowboy Who Tried to Do Right but Always Got Wrong."

Imperial Valley Express, 17-June-1921

Tom Mix means business in A Ridin' Romeo.

Clovis News, 09-June-1921

Tom and dog in The Road Demon. I wonder if it is the same dog who appeared with Tom and Tony in The Untamed.

Albuquerque Evening Herald, 14-June-1921

I thought Tom might not mind if I threw in a contemporary western star and a kid. Art Acord appeared in many silent films, but did not make the transition to talkies. He served in France during World War One and was decorated for bravery. "That Wonderful Boy," Breezy Eason was B Reeves Eason Jr, son of director B Reeves Eason Sr.

Monday, June 14, 2021

Flag Day, 2021 -- June 14, 2021

 

listal.com

Happy Flag Day, everyone. Jacqueline Wells began appearing in silent films as a child. After a substantial career in talkies, Warner Brothers asked her to change her name so she would appear to be a fresh face. She chose Julie Bishop. The Black Cat with Karloff and Lugosi is a wonderful movie.

listal.com

listal.com


Sunday, June 13, 2021

Harold Lloyd -- A Star Who is Sold 100% to the Public -- June 13, 2021

 


Motion Picture News, 11-June-1921

Here we have a two-page trade ad for "Among Those Present." I like the rabbit. On the second page, Harold poses with Mildred Davis, who he would marry in 1923.

Topeka State Journal, 11-June-1921

I like the caricatures in these ads for "Now or Never."

Washington Evening Star, 18-June-1921


Friday, June 11, 2021

Roscoe Arbuckle -- Crazy to Marry -- June 11, 2021

 

Motion Picture News, 11-June-1921

100 years ago, Roscoe Arbuckle appeared in a lot of movies in a short time. He appeared in five features released during 1921. Crazy to Marry would be his last feature film released before the dreadful events of September, 1921. 

The big ugly guy whose skull Roscoe is about to drill is Bull Montana. Roscoe is going to perform a lobotomy to remove the "crime bump" from Bull's brain. 

Motion Picture News, 25-June-1921

Lila Lee was Roscoe's leading lady.

Indiana Daily Times, 04-June-1921

Roscoe's earlier feature The Travelling Salesman was still in release. I like the caricature.

Wednesday, June 9, 2021

Zane Grey Week -- The Man of the Forest -- June 9, 2021

Motion Picture News, 21-May-1921

Zane Grey was a popular Western novelist in the first half of the Twentieth Century. I had read about movies made from his stories, so I took a few novels out from the Anza Branch Library. It turns out that he was not a very good writer, but he did produce interesting characters and descriptions.

I thought I might join with producer Benjamin B Hampton and have a Zane Grey Week. Why did producer Benjamin B Hampton have a Zane Grey Week? It was to help promote his production of The Man of the Forest, the third of his six adaptions of Zane Grey novels.

The Photodramatist, September, 1921

Hampton must have been an interesting guy. He published A History of the Movies in 1931. He was editor and publisher of Hampton's Magazine, which he founded in 1908 and stopped publishing in 1912. He wrote a column in The Photodramatist.

Chicasha Daily Express, 23-June-1923

The Man of the Forest starred Carl Gantvoort. I don't think I have ever heard of Carl Gantvoort, whose IMDB entry lists only nine films. Jean Hersholt later became a well-known actor and a dedicated philanthropist.

Indiana Daily Times, 04-April-1921


Washington Evening Star, 01-February-1932
Benjamin B Hampton died in 1932 at the age of 57. If I ever do another Zane Grey Week, I should write about his movies. 

Thank you to everyone who visited Zane Grey Week.

Tuesday, June 8, 2021

Zane Grey Week -- Riders on Television -- June 8, 2021

Motion Picture News, 21-May-1921

Zane Grey was a popular Western novelist in the first half of the Twentieth Century. I had read about movies made from his stories, so I took a few novels out from the Anza Branch Library. It turns out that he was not a very good writer, but he did produce interesting characters and descriptions.

I thought I might join with producer Benjamin B Hampton and have a Zane Grey Week.

One of the books that I read was his most popular, Riders of the Purple Sage. It introduced Lassiter, a classic Western hero. Aside from some startling anti-LDS business, Riders of the Purple Sage has a good story. 

listal.com

The fifth and to-date last production of Riders of the Purple Sage appeared on TNT (Turner Network Television) on 21-January-1996. If I had known it was going to be shown, I would have tried to watch it. Ed Harris would be good as Lassiter. The film was shot in Utah and Arizona. The villainous religious group was not identified as Mormon, but there were some heavy hints. Fox had nothing to do with it. 

I would not be surprised to learn that another remake is being planned.

Publishers Weekly, 21-May-1921
Tomorrow: The Man of the Forest

Monday, June 7, 2021

Clarence Williams III, RIP -- June 7, 2021

www.listal.com

I was sad to learn that actor Clarence Williams III, who starred in The Mod Squad on television has died. Co-star Peggy Lipton died in 2019, so that leaves Michael Cole as the only living member of the team. 

Clarence Williams III was the grandchild of  composer/pianist/publisher/producer and band leader Clarence Williams, whose name is all over early jazz and blues recordings, and jazz and blues singer Eva Taylor. 


I remember the show only vaguely, but "The Odd Squad" in June, 1969 was one of my favorite Mad Magazine television satires. You could always tell which actresses Mort Drucker really liked.

Zane Grey Week -- Another George Plays Lassiter -- June 7, 2021

Motion Picture News, 21-May-1921

Zane Grey was a popular Western novelist in the first half of the Twentieth Century. I had read about movies made from his stories, so I took a few novels out from the Anza Branch Library. It turns out that he was not a very good writer, but he did produce interesting characters and descriptions.

I thought I might join with producer Benjamin B Hampton and have a Zane Grey Week.

One of the books that I read was his most popular, Riders of the Purple Sage. It introduced Lassiter, a classic Western hero. Aside from some startling anti-LDS business, Riders of the Purple Sage has a good story. 

Fox produced Riders, its sequel and two other Zane Grey movies in the late Teens and early 1920s with William Farnum playing the hero. Not many years later, Fox filmed the same set of stories starring Tom Mix. Then came the talkies, and Fox filmed the stories again with George O'Brien in the lead. Fox returned to its Zane Grey properties in 1941 and 1942.

listal.com

In The Last of the Duanes, George Montgomery played Buck Duane. Montgomery was a multi-talented artist who appeared in a lot of westerns. During World War Two he joined the US Army Air Force. William Farnum, who had played Buck Duane in the 1919 version, played a major in the Texas Rangers.

Newark Leader, 23-October-1941

listal.com

George Montgomery was the fourth actor to play Lassiter in a movie adaption of Riders of the Purple Sage. Instead of Mormons, the bad guys are crooked judges. 

Worcester Democrat and Ledger-Enterprise, 05-December-1941

I can safely say I have never heard of Pocomoke City, Maryland. 

listal.com

And then Fox threw us a curveball. They produced another version of The Lone Star Ranger, but they replaced George Montgomery with John Kimbro. Kimbro was a professional football player. The Lone Star Ranger was his second and last film. Why did they ditch George Montgomery? Perhaps Montgomery cost too much. I don't think George Montgomery left for the Army until 1943. William Farnum, the original Buck Duane, repeated the part he had played in the 1941 The Last of the Duanes.

And then Fox threw us another curveball. They did not produce a fourth remake of The Rainbow Trail

Publishers Weekly, 21-May-1921

Tomorrow: Riders on Television

Sunday, June 6, 2021

Zane Grey Week -- Riders as a Talkie -- June 6, 2021

Motion Picture News, 21-May-1921

Zane Grey was a popular Western novelist in the first half of the Twentieth Century. I had read about movies made from his stories, so I took a few novels out from the Anza Branch Library. It turns out that he was not a very good writer, but he did produce interesting characters and descriptions.

I thought I might join with producer Benjamin B Hampton and have a Zane Grey Week.

One of the books that I read was his most popular, Riders of the Purple Sage. It introduced Lassiter, a classic Western hero. Aside from some startling anti-LDS business, Riders of the Purple Sage has a good story. 

Fox produced Riders, its sequel and two other Zane Grey movies in the late Teens and early 1920s with William Farnum playing the hero. Not many years later, Fox filmed the same set of stories starring Tom Mix. Then came the talkies. 

listal.com

Fox had adopted the Movietone sound-on-film system, which made it easier to shoot out-of-doors than  did the Warner Brothers' Vitaphone sound-on-disk system. Fox began to produce talkie Westerns like In Old Arizona, the first Cisco Kid movie. This made it natural for Fox to look again at its Zane Grey properties. 

Variety, 19-June-1929

Fox started with The Lone Star Ranger. "Zane Grey's first talking picture. Out-door recording which only Fox Movietone has successfully achieved..." 

Screenland, April, 1930

Buck Duane was played by George O'Brien, a big, well-built guy who was perfect for Westerns. His father was a former San Francisco Chief of Police. George was an excellent horseman. Leading lady Sue Carol later became a talent agent and married Alan Ladd.

New Movie, January, 1930

Not only was The Lone Star Ranger shot with sound and shot outdoors, but parts of it were shot on location in Utah.

Motion Picture News, 31-May-1931

Fox followed The Lone Star Ranger with another adaption of The Last of the Duanes, also starring George O'Brien. Myra Loy was there, but she was not the leading lady. What were they thinking?

Washington Evening Star, 18-May-1921

George's leading lady was Lucile Browne. I would have gone for Myrna Loy.

Motion Picture Herald, 26-September-1931

Fox followed The Last of the Duanes with another adaption of Riders of the Purple Sage. George's leading lady Marguerite Churchill had been in John Wayne's first starring picture, The Big Trail.

listal.com

listal.com

Following its standard process, Fox then filmed the sequel to Riders, The Rainbow Trail, also starring George O'Brien. leading lady Cecilia Parker later played Andy Hardy's sister in the M-G-M series.

Washington Evening Star, 07-September-1930

Watuga Democrat, 28-September-1933

In 1933, one year after The Rainbow Trail, Fox starred George O'Brian in its third adaption of The Last Trail. George played Tom Dane. I can't find much promotional material for it. This was its last appearance as a movie.

Publishers Weekly, 30-April-1921

Tomorrow: Another George Plays Lassiter

Saturday, June 5, 2021

Zane Grey Week -- Tom Mix Takes Over -- June 5, 2021

Motion Picture News, 21-May-1921

Zane Grey was a popular Western novelist in the first half of the Twentieth Century. I had read about movies made from his stories, so I took a few novels out from the Anza Branch Library. It turns out that he was not a very good writer, but he did produce interesting characters and descriptions.

I thought I might join with producer Benjamin B Hampton and have a Zane Grey Week.

One of the books that I read was his most popular, Riders of the Purple Sage. It introduced Lassiter, a classic Western hero. Aside from some startling anti-LDS business, Riders of the Purple Sage has a good story. 

As we saw yesterday, the Fox Film Corporation had produced a group of four films based on Zane Grey novels, all starring William Farnum. Just a few years later, Fox remade all four movies, in a different order, featuring the biggest Western star of all, Tom Mix. 

Moving Picture World, 23-September-1923

In The Lone Star Ranger, Tom Mix plays Buck Duane who gets a lot of grief because his father was a bandit. Later he becomes a Texas Ranger.

listal.com

Omaha Bee, 09-November-1924

Tom Mix played Buck Duane again in The Last of the Duanes.

listal.com

Seattle Star, 11-April-1925

I don't think the ebullient Tom Mix was the perfect person to play Lassiter. A vault fire on 09-July-1937 destroyed most of Fox's silent films, including most of Tom Mix's silent features. Somehow, Riders of the Purple Sage, one of his least typical movies, survived the fire.

Photoplay, June, 1925

Seattle Star, 07-May-1925

Tom again played Lassiter in an adaption of the sequel, The Rainbow Trail

Seattle Star, 12-May-1925

Spokane Woman, 24-March-1927

In 1927, two years after Fox released The Rainbow Trail, they decided to make a second version of The Last Trail. This time it starred the man who had appeared in the other four movies, Tom Mix. Tom Mix played Tom Dane. 

Notice that the ad next to Fox's promotes Warner Brothers' Don Juan, the first feature film released with a Vitaphone, sound on disk, musical score.

Publishers Weekly, 30-April-1921

Tomorrow: Riders as a Talkie